Posts Tagged: new mexico

Frybread, Navajo Tacos, Arizona, and New Mexico

  • Frybread #1
  • Frybread #2
  • Frybread #3

Frybread is inescapable in the American Southwest.  If you had to pick one food that would represent Native American culture, this would be it.  Frybread is essentially a pancake of fried dough that can be served alone as a snack or made into two different types of sandwiches: a Navajo (or Indian) taco, or a meat pocket-type thing.

Frybread originated on the “Long Walk” that the Navajo were forced to make during their relocation from Arizona to New Mexico in 1864.  Luckily for them, the US government was kind enough to provide them with flour, salt, sugar, and lard (yes, that was just a tad bit sarcastic).  Thus, frybread was born: a food with a very contradictory identity.  Though frybread is a symbol of the painful past that the Native Americans have shared, it is also a way for tribes to connect over this history.  Furthermore, frybread is central to powwows (gatherings among tribes), but is also credited with many of the health issues among Native Americans today.

But how does all of this relate to sandwiches?  Frybread is the base of many dishes…both as a convenient way to eat your mutton and sheep intestines (pictures #2 and #3), and in Navajo tacos (picture #1).  A Navajo taco consists of frybread, ground beef, chili beans, lettuce, tomatoes, and cheese.  The first picture is a Navajo taco from Charly’s in Flagstaff, AZ.  Sadly, we found out once we actually got to the Navajo reservation in Gallup, NM that we had Americanized tacos, which was disappointing, but kind of predictable.  I’m sure that by this point, I don’t have to argue the fact that the Navajo taco is a sandwich, even if it is easier to eat with a fork and knife.

Fortunately for us, we have a friend living in Gallup, and so we got to experience the real Navajo culture…and real frybread.  We went to the Navajo flea market, and aside from buying really cool jewelry,  we ate a whole lot.  The second picture is roast mutton…meat, tomatoes, lettuce, onion, all wrapped in frybread.  Now, this definitely fits into the sandwich category, as you can pick it up and munch.  The mutton, coincidentally, was also fantastic (I think I thanked the Navajo woman about twelve times).  The third picture doesn’t appear to qualify as a sandwich, considering that there are three kinds of meat (including a rib and sheep intestines), a potato, a corn cob, all on top of frybread.  A great way to eat this dish, however, is to break off a little bit of fry bread and a little bit of meat and eat with your hands.  This meal was really fun because I got the boys to try the sheep intestines.

So though I didn’t really talk about sandwiches on this blog, I thought it was important to talk about a different kind of bread, especially one with such a cultural importance.  Plus, everything with frybread is phenomenally delicious.