Posts Tagged: fish

Onigiri

  • Kawaba - Shrimp Fry and Spicy Tuna Mayo
    Kawaba - Shrimp Fry and Spicy Tuna Mayo
  • Sunny Blue - Mentaiko (spicy cod roe in cup) and Sunny Blue Curry
    Sunny Blue - Mentaiko (spicy cod roe in cup) and Sunny Blue Curry
  • Kawaba - The Bomb
    Kawaba - The Bomb
  • Sunny Blue - Tuna Mayo and Mentaiko
    Sunny Blue - Tuna Mayo and Mentaiko
  • Sunny Blue - Assortment
    Sunny Blue - Assortment

As soon as I tried onigiri for the first time, I knew I had to eventually post something about it on Anatomy of a Sandwich. I had thought that, like many other posts I’ve done, I’d have to spend most of my time justifying how onigiri fit into a sandwich blog. But then I opened up a book by Shizuo Tsuji called Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. This book is widely considered to be the first translation of Japanese cuisine into Western understanding, not to mention the foremost encyclopedia on traditional Japanese foods. So needless to say, I was thrilled to find this sentence leading the description of onigiri: “Japan’s traditional sandwich equivalent.”

This means, fortunately, that instead of validating onigiri’s inclusion here, I get to talk about the fun stuff!!!

Onigiri, also called omusubi, are delicious balls of rice stuffed with vegetable, meat, or seafood fillings, then wrapped in seaweed (called nori). Though the word “onigiri” has the same root as “nigiri”, a form of sushi, rice balls actually fall into a different category of Japanese cuisine. The relation here has to do with the etymology of “nigiri”, which means “clenched” or “gripped”. If you’ve ever seen a sushi chef make nigiri, then you know what I’m talking about. Onigiri are also clenched, as the rice must be pressed hard enough to stick together, without squishing the rice grains, which makes them harden. In fact, it is said that, since cooking was traditionally done by women, the clenching of onigiri was a sign of a mother’s love gripping the rice together. Onigiri are usually triangular in shape, but can also be tubular or round.

On the other hand, there is a very big difference between nigiri and onigiri: the rice. While sushi rice is made with vinegar and sugar, onigiri rice is simply steamed. Furthermore, when making nigiri, you simply wet your hands so the rice sticks together, but not to your hands. With onigiri, wetting your hands is followed by salting your hands, so that as you press the ball together, you are also seasoning it. The reason behind this actually has to do with the original reason each dish was created. Sushi was created as a way to preserve fish: the fish was put between layers of this vinegared rice in order to preserve the fish. Alternatively, onigiri is salted because it originated as a method to preserve rice, not the filling inside. To this end, traditional fillings for onigiri are usually preserved in and of themselves, like umeboshi (pickled plum), salted salmon, and tarako (salted cod roe). Onigiri is also on the larger side, meant to be handheld, you know, like a sandwich!!! Furthermore, onigiri is often thought to be Japan’s oldest food, possibly originating before the widespread use of chopsticks, since it takes rice, a difficult food to eat with your hands, and makes it more accessible. Archaeologists have even found a lump of carbonized rice from around 300 BC that showed evidence of being held by human hands!

Today, onigiri holds a very similar place in Japanese cuisine as sandwiches do in Western cuisine. Found everywhere from onigiri shops to gas stations and convenience stores, modern technology has had a large part in making onigiri as widespread as it is. While traditionally, the emotional associations and precision needed to make onigiri made it impossible to mass produce, these days we’ve figured out how to have machines grip the rice properly, stuff the ball with filling, and package the ball with nori in a way that prevents the seaweed from going soggy. It is a truly portable meal that is eaten in the same context as sandwiches, and is considered one of the best platforms for highlighting local flavors and trends. They are also used to explore other cuisines, as now you can find the traditionally English filling of tuna mayo, or even Italian-style, with tomato sauce and cheese. In LA, we have two great onigiri spots: Sunny Blue (in Santa Monica, with a new location in Culver City) and Kawaba Rice Ball in Hollywood. Both offer a great combination of traditional and modern fillings, as you can see in the photos. And both are unbelievably delicious and reasonably priced, so are great for a snack or a full meal, which means if you pass one of these places, you have no excuse not to go!

 

R + D Kitchen’s Special Tuna Burger

  • R + D Tuna Burger #1
  • R + D Tuna Burger #2

R+D Kitchen in Santa Monica has a relatively small menu, but every item is interesting and delicious.  To supplement the menu, they have multiple specials every day, including a sandwich of the day.  This tuna burger is a recurring special sandwich and was actually the first thing I ever ate from R + D.  It’s practically bigger than my head and almost impossible to eat, which means I generally end up resorting to a fork and knife.

What I like about this sandwich is that it furthers R + D’s style: American dishes at first glance, yet with enough of an interesting twist that the restaurant is always packed.  The tuna burger, for example, is constructed much more like a classic American hamburger than the usual Japanese influenced ahi tuna burger.  There is no sign of wasabi or anything remotely Asian on this sandwich, just good old-fashioned lettuce, tomatoes, pickles, and a nice mayo. In addition, the tuna was not a rare steak, but instead a patty, served on the rare side.  All in all, it almost felt like I was eating a regular hamburger, but with the added bonus that instead of red meat, I was indulging in sashimi grade tuna.  It is sandwiches like this, ones that combine familiar flavors into interesting combinations, that continue my love for food.