Sushi at Nagao

  • Nagao Moonlight #3
  • Nagao TNT Roll
  • Nagao Crab Wrapped in Tuna and Halibut
  • Nagao Salmon Sushi
  • Nagao Scallop Sushi
  • Nagao Soybean Paper Roll with Salmon
  • Nagao Toro Sushi
  • Nagao Uni Sushi

For those of you who have been following AOAS, I’m sure that once you saw the tacos you must have been waiting for the sushi post.  Well, here it is.  My brother, Ethan, is leaving for college tomorrow, so my family went to Nagao for his last family meal.  Nagao is a wonderful sushi restaurant in Brentwood owned by sushi chef Nagao.  My family has been going there basically since the restaurant opened, so we love to sit in Nagao’s section at the bar.

But the real question is, why does sushi qualify as a sandwich?  Using the same logic that applied to the tacos, we can see that sushi can be deemed a conceptual sandwich.  Let’s take the TNT roll (photo #2) as an example, since it is the most common form of sushi roll: seaweed and rice wrapped around yellowtail, smelt eggs, green onion, cucumber, and avocado.  Immediately, similarities arise: the rice taking the place of the bread, the yellowtail as the main “meat” and the same fixings: cucumber, avocado, and green onion.  Basically, a sushi roll is like a wrap.  If you’re still skeptical, consider a handroll.

So then, how do the other sushi dishes pictured above fit in to the framework?  The soybean paper roll (photo #6) follows the same idea as the TNT.  As for the rest, let’s consider sandwiches from a different perspective than just the ingredients.  What else makes a sandwich?  Much of this answer comes from what a sandwich offers the eater: a meal that can take infinite forms, yet is simple to make and even easier to eat: no utensils required.  The ease of eating, or rather, the convenience of being able to eat this type of food with your hands, is a part of why sandwiches are often the most appealing choice for a meal.  This idea, that eating with your hands is the right way to eat, can also be seen in sushi.  Yes, chopsticks are involved when it comes to sushi, but often, fingers are the way to go.  In a similar vein, bread doesn’t always have to be the force holding the sandwich or wrap together, as seen in this post about In N Out.  Therefore, photo #3, crab wrapped in tuna and halibut, can be seen as little mini wraps.

Obviously, some of these photos really are a stretch in terms of arguing that sushi is like a sandwich, but they looked so good I just had to include them.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *