Monthly Archives: January 2011

The Bazaar and Uni Buns

  • Uni Buns #1
  • Uni Buns #2

Thus far, this blog has (hopefully) demonstrated my love of sandwiches, and it should be apparent by now that I just love food in general.  The one thing that I don’t think is quite so obvious is how much I love to experiment with food; unfortunately, a sandwich blog can’t always illustrate this.  Therefore, I give you the first, of hopefully many, posts that involve stranger foods.

The Bazaar is a restaurant that is, well, bizarre.  Since this isn’t a restaurant review, but a sandwich blog, I’ll let you do your own research (just go there if you like awesome food in a unique setting).  This post is more about my love affair with sea urchin.

Growing up, my mom would always order sea urchin, known as uni, at sushi restaurants, and to be perfectly honest, it freaked me out.  I don’t really remember my first uni experience, but once I tried it, I never went back.  Now, if anything has sea urchin in it, chances are, I’m ordering it.  For me, sea urchin is a food that has more ties to memory and experience than most foods.  Most notably, diving for sea urchins in Santorini, then cracking them open on the red sand beach and eating them right then and there.  Though most people find sea urchin very off-putting, to me, it evokes the ocean and is unbelievably decadent and delicious.

THIS is why I will order sea urchin everywhere, and why I loved these uni buns so much.  Not only was the sea urchin itself awesome, but the combination of Asian flavors combined into a mini sandwich made this dish irresistible to me.  The soft doughiness of the brioche, the crunch of the tempura, the heat of the serrano, the hint of ginger, the cool creaminess of the avocado, the melt-in-your-mouth texture and saltiness of the sea urchin…now this is taking a sandwich to a whole new level.

New York Pizza

  • New York Pizza #1
  • New York Pizza #2

Now before I begin, I want to note that it has been quite some time since I’ve posted.  Sorry.

Secondly, and much more pertinent to this post, I am not a pizza expert.  On the other hand, I very much know what exactly I like and don’t like when it comes to pizza.  Quite honestly, that deep-dish, thick crust stuff just doesn’t do it for me.  That is why I always make sure to eat pizza as much as I can when in New York.

I hope that by now, I won’t have to argue too strongly as to why pizza fits into the sandwich category.  It very much resembles an open-face sandwich and, furthermore, is most often eaten with your hands (unless of course, you are one of THOSE people who eat their pizza with a fork and knife, and probably pat off all the grease as well).

What is really interesting about pizza, in my opinion, is how many different cultures have laid claim to it.  Its origins in Naples make it inherently Italian, yet America has adopted it into its food culture as well.  Going further, Chicago has made the pizza its own, as has New York, and any college student could tell you that pizza is one of their most eaten foods.  For me, this is the beauty of food — its universality allows all sorts of people to eat the same food while meaning very different things to each person.