Monthly Archives: September 2010

Molly’s Meatloaf-Style Burgers

  • Meatloaf Burger #1
  • Meatloaf Burger #2

I spent 4th of July weekend at my friend’s house in Welfleet, MA, out almost at the end of Cape Cod.  All of my friends from school were there, and let me tell you, it was quite a blast.  One of my friends, who was living in the Welfleet house, is currently a student at the Johnson and Wales culinary school in Providence, RI.  Needless to say, the girl can cook.

One night, we were getting ready to grill up some burgers when we realized that we were out of propane.  Many delays and failures later, Molly offered to make the burgers meatloaf-style.  Now I must admit, I was quite hesitant, as I am not the biggest fan of meatloaf.  After the first bite, however, I was a convert.  This was probably one of the most delicious burgers I have ever eaten.  It was juicy and rich in a way that I have never found in a meatloaf, and it was seasoned to perfection.

Now back in California, I recently had some friends over for some BBQing and pool, and once again, one thing led to another and as it got later, the idea of getting the grill going to make burgers was becoming less appealing.  I then decided to attempt Molly’s meatloaf-style burgers, since they had been such a success in Cape Cod.  Unfortunately, my burgers did not turn out as well as Molly’s but I think the next try will bring much better results.  Pictured above is my version of Molly’s burger, made with cheddar cheese, lettuce, and avocado.

Ultimately, this burger is a great example of how to combine cooking techniques to create a new dish.  It also illustrates that even the most serious of situations, such as running out of propane, can be remedied with a little outside-the-box thinking.

 

 

The Farms

  • The Farms #1
  • The Farms #2

The Farms is a Mom and Pop grocery store in Santa Monica that my family has been going to since we moved here 18 years ago.  It’s one of those places where everyone recognizes you and where all the regulars have house accounts.  My brother even worked as a bag boy there for a summer.

This sandwich doesn’t have any crazy ingredients, nor is it an innovation in the world of sandwiches.  For me, this sandwich is a throw back to childhood: I probably ate it once a week in elementary school.  I have a vague memory of my mom giving me the sandwich for the first time, and thinking that the combination of turkey, cheddar, lettuce, pickles, and mayo was not what I generally wanted out of a sandwich.  I also have a fuzzy recollection of loving the sandwich from the first bite.

That nostalgia can play a role in food likes and choices is unsurprising.  Many anthropologists choose memory as their topic of study, as it plays a huge role in the nature vs nurture debate.  To use this sandwich as an example: my current food likes generally fall into the more unusual realms: I like foods that are different or unknown.  I like to be adventurous in my eating, even though my father is a rather picky eater, and my mother has food restrictions of her own.  By nature, I should not be quite as bold in my food choices, but I was nurtured into having a love for food, and I believe that my life experiences thus far have created this side in my eating habits.

This sandwich continues to be a meal I choose despite it’s simplicity.  Though it is partially because the sandwich is delicious by being straightforward with no frills, a huge part of my enjoyment is due to the subconscious memory of enjoying it time and time again as a child.  Though this connection between memory and food choice has been illustrated through this sandwich, it is by no means limited to sandwiches.  Any food can induce this experience, which is one of the amazing things about people and their relationship to food.

Philippe’s and the French Dip

  • Philippe's #1
  • Philippe's #2
  • Philippe's #3

The French Dip sandwich.  This delicious iconic American sandwich is usually served on a French roll with a side of au jus for dipping, but Philippe’s, one of two restaurants that claim to have originated the French Dip, dips the entire sandwich just prior to serving.  This unique style comes from the story of the sandwich’s creation: one day in 1918, ten years after the restaurant opened, Philippe himself was making a sandwich when he accidentally dropped the roll into a roasting pan filled with still-hot juices from the oven.  The customer took the sandwich anyway, and the next day, brought back friends who all requested the “dipped sandwich.”

Philippe’s serves its dip sandwich with either beef, pork, ham, lamb, or turkey, and you can get it single-dipped, double-dipped, or wet.  I got a single dipped, beef with American cheese, and was blown away.  The whole thing just melted in your mouth: between the super tender beef, the melty cheese, and the firm but juice-soaked bread, the Philippe’s French Dip started a party in my mouth.

The other restaurant that lays claim to the invention of the French Dip is Cole’s Pacific Electric Buffet…which will have to be checked out on another sandwich adventure…